The Mountains Are Calling

The Mountains Are Calling

Picture heavy post! Knitting photos near the bottom!

Last week Jonathan and I went on our one year anniversary trip! We decided to take advantage of our anniversary’s proximity to Labor Day and delay our trip until September. Thursday night, after work, we jumped in the car and drove west as long as we could (three hours!) That made the remaining six hours to Boulder, Colorado much more enjoyable. We’d heard a lot of people mention how boring the drive from KC to Boulder was; I’m not sure what they were talking about though.

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I find windmills facinating

We loved the entire drive! It was amazing to see all of the farm land, cattle, and windmills going on and on for miles. The most delightful part of the drive was undoubtedly the sunflowers. Kansas is the sunflower state, after all. We had to take advantage of the fields of flowers along the interstate.

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Is it illegal to stop on the interstate like this? 

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Of course, the interstate sunflowers had nothing on the flowers alongside the “Welcome to Colorado” sign. This was one of the most breathtaking views of our entire trip, and we’d only just arrived!

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While we were driving, I pulled out my unfinished NaKniSweMo from last year. I figured that the mountains in fall would be a great opportunity to wear the sweater for the first time! I managed to finish steeking the sweater before hitting the road, and the entire drive up was spent weaving in ends, knitting on a border, and sewing on buttons. Phew.

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On the second day of our trip, we decided to do a day hike up the FlatIrons to the Royal Arch. What was supposed to be a two hour morning hike turned into a four hour, five and a half mile, strenuous hike at extreme elevation (my sweet husband didn’t check the map). It was the most physically challenging thing I’ve ever done before, but Jon and I stuck it out together! We took hundreds of photos and drank two liters of water while going up, up, up. Near the end, I started to wonder if the view at the top could possibly be worth the pain, but we pushed on anyways!

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So close to the top!

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Top of the arch, I’m sitting inside of it. Yes, those are knitting needles in my hand. 

Sadly, by the time we made it to the top of the mountain, storm clouds were rolling in, we were starving, and the sun was setting. We had no time for photos so we rushed down (which was surprisingly more emotionally trying than going up) and finished off our night with a fancy dinner and lots of drinks.

The next day, we decided to drive back up the trail and do some laid back sightseeing. I was pretty exhausted, but the pictures were so so worth it. I present my Oranje sweater!

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The Knitimg_2538

This was my first ever fair isle project. I go big, right? This yummy sweater is knit on a US6 with sport weight yarn. I used Debbie Bliss’ Fine Donegal which is technically a fingering weight yarn. However, the single ply wool is rather heavy and I managed to hit the same gauge on the sweater as if I’d used a true sport weight. img_2537

I’ll be upfront, this sweater has some of flaws to it. The armpits have little give to them, so when I lift my arms, the whole sweater comes with me. And seeing as this was my first time working fair isle, the yoke is a tad snug. I’m re-blocking the sweater and am going to re-seam the armpits again in hopes of having a bit more give. I think this will ultimately be a success. I have faith since the first time I blocked the sweater (before steeking which I highly recommend) it went from frumpy to fabulous. The collar could also probably stand to be blocked a little higher as well. img_2536

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I really love the brown button border of this sweater, but honestly, it’s a little finicky. It takes a day and a half for me to button this up proper, and the mass of buttons leads to gapping (though this could possibly be remedied with blocking). The fair isle often doesn’t line up if my buttons are askew-as you can see in the photo above. A part of me wishes I’d been patient and waited to get home to put in a zipper, but I wanted this to be done so so badly! And I love the brown highlights too much to not have them.

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Tucking my floats

Overall, I adore this sweater. The flaws in it are small fish compared to the amount of effort and time I put into this. I learned a lot while knitting this, like how to “tuck my floats” on the yoke so that there’s not a mass of loose strands inside the sweater waiting to be snagged. I did my first steek (you can check out the video here on my instagram) and I learned how to do a proper steek column so that you aren’t terrified while cutting!!! After hiking up a mountain, I feel safe in saying that this is an epic sweater that is worthy of the Dutch knitting traditions Ann Weaver based the design on. I would totes heard sheep while wearing this sweater, up a mountain even.

I’m so glad that I decided at the last minute to finish it on the car ride to Boulder. This will be a wardrobe stable for my first winter in KC. For me, this represents a new benchmark in my knitting. I learned so much while making this. I was so careful to get gauge and make size adjustments as needed so my effort wouldn’t be wasted. This makes my old work feel like child’s play, and I think I’ve finally kicked down the door to “a knitted wardrobe” instead of just lacey accessories, sorry Darling Emma. I’m ready to take my knitting to the next level. I still have a painful amount to learn (like seriously how to get more ease into these armpits). But I’m happy to learn from my mistakes and enjoy the journey, but right now, I’m just gonna wear my sweater and feel baller.

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Yes, It IS your grandmother’s knitting.

Winter Stash

Hi, lovies! Jon and I just got back from our one year anniversary trip! I have so much to tell you! But after a 16hour round trip drive, climbing a mountain, and all the laundry, I’m still recovering. Until then, here’s a post about my winter yarn stash!

Since moving to KC, I’ve made a lot of effort to get my yarn stash under control. Post-moving finances aside, I was starting to feel overwhelmed by the amount of yarn I had. It was no longer something to delight in, but a burden to haul through. I mean, seriously.

When one organizes a yarn closet, one must first pull everything onto the floor #realtruth #knittersofinstagram

It would appear that six garbage bags of yarn is the thin wooly line between abundance and overstuffed. I’ve indefinitely tightened the purse strings on my yarn budget. I’ve bought 12 skeins of yarn in 9 months. Now, I don’t know about the rest of you out there, but considering I used to spend hundreds of dollars on bags of yarn (I’m talking entire paychecks and half the sale’s rack) this is an amazing feat. I also have to throw in, three of those skeins were a birthday present for myself, so they don’t count. Mhm.

Buying less yarn, though a good start, did little to reduce the absurd amounts of yarn I already had. After a few teeth gritting sessions of self restraint, I’ve become a monogamous knitter. One project at a time, get it done and on to the next. I’ve also relaxed my expectations on what is humanly possible to knit in a single season. When I stopped expecting myself to knit 20 pairs of socks and 1,000 sweaters in a three month period, I was able to better focus on the knitting I actually had going on and could just get it done. I used to spend my “knitting” time browsing Ravelry trying to assign projects to all of my yarn and create a queue. All the while I would have about 8 unfinished projects languishing in the corner. No more of that

I think what’s helped the most, though, is dividing my yarn up by seasons. This spring and summer, my winter yarns were packed away in the back of my closet while my “summer” yarn (lace weights, bright pinks, silks ect ect) lived in a large wicker basket under my desk. This made everything seem more doable. I diligently worked at knitting down this basket, while neither thinking about the winter yarn in the closet, nor expecting that I could knit through all the spring and summer yarns. This week, with the undeniable scent of fall in the air, I unpacked my winter yarns and placed the summer ones in the back of the closet. Until next year, my pretties!

It’s so exciting and refreshing to cast eyes over all of this delicious yarn that I haven’t seen for months! And what a delight to see so many piles of sweater yarn! And all in worsted and aran weight. Bliss. I’m itching to cast on and it feels like I have a clean slate for the cold weather season without having all of my yarn mixed in together, haunting me, judging me. Check out my winter stash!

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Cloud Escape

I decided to really get into winter knitting this year. I usually only manage one or two sweaters every winter, and I don’t have a chance to enjoy them for more than a few weeks before it’s time to pack them away. This is due to me being so dead set on doing Christmas presents for *everyone* and their mom. Like, actually. It’s always so stressful and I’ve done it four times in a row now. I think this year I’m going to take a break. I’ve decided to do no more than four presents. There shall be store bought scarves and coupons all around this year! And Walgreen’s Christmas cards, soooo many cards. This year, I deserve Escape.

IMG_2322.JPGIn the beginning of August, I cast on for this beauty. An oversized, split side, bi-color sweater. The yarn was a total impulse buy. I walked into my LYS in Arkansas and the yarn was nestled together on the shelf *screaming at me* to take it home. Before I even knew what was happening, I was handing over my credit card and signing my name in blood.

IMG_2323The yarn is, of course, more Dream in Color. I think they should sponsor me. This time I’m using the Jilly Cashmere. I love the halo that the yarn has while also holding sharp stitch definition. The blue, ‘Forget Me’, is to die for. Actually impossible to forget (see what I did there?)I love how it has splashes of brown and green in it. I only have one skein of the ‘Brownie’ brown, so I’m a little nervous about having enough to do full sleeves, I hope that them being tight, clingy sleeves will mean I can make a little yarn go a long way. If not,some stripe work might be in order. I don’t know about you guys, but I’m officially ready for Fall to touch down.

IMG_2325Also, Jon and I have welcomed a new member into our family. A little ball of fluffy kitten that relentlessly plays and mews at us all day. Kora. I’m totally in love. I mean, look at these paws


Look at that tail


Look at that FACE


A deep and insatiable affection has been stirred up in me, and I can’t get over this kitten. She loves to crawl all over me, and cuddle, and play, and basically all the things Luna is too cool for. Don’t worry, Luna is happy, and adjusting well to the newcomer. I think she appreciates that I no longer harass her for photos. And I think she likes keeping Kora in place with head bops and swats.

 Expect to see much more of this little kitten, and if you (like me) can’t get enough of her, follow my Instagram for endless pictures!

Until next time, daydream on my lovelies!

(Just one more picture)

Camino Bubbles- Fire and Ice

I have a lace addiction. Truly. I believe most of my stash is made up of lace and fingering weight yarn. I have a sweater’s worth or two of worsted weight yarn, but if you close your eyes and take a random draw from my stash you’ll most likely pull out a 500yd skein of kettle dyed lace. I can’t help it. It’s so rewarding to knit an entire shawl or sweater out of one skein of yarn. And the way light shines through lace? Mm, to die for.

img_5308After finishing my commission, I was really excited to cast on for a “quick knit”. Though, after that sweater, anything could be considered quick. The Camino Bubbles by Kieran Foley is only 89 stitches wide though, so it seemed very inviting. This was a glorious knit and the drop stitch bubbles were addicting!

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The Yarn

I used two skeins of Jilly Lace: Dream in Color. I’m completely sold on this brand. This will be the fourth project I’ve knit using their yarns. The blue is ‘Blue Fish’ and the brilliant orange is ‘Great Pumpkin’. The skeins are 880yds each and 100% merino wool. Yum. There’s actually enough yardage on these skeins to knit two Camino Bubbles! The yarn is a touch sticky/grabby because it’s single ply, however, the bubble stitches were easy to drop. The colors of this yarn are so vivid and saturated that I was terrified they would bleed (especially the blue) from even wet blocking. The yarn claims to be machine washable though, so I went ahead and soaked this shawl and pinned it down. There was no bleeding and I didn’t notice any color leaking while it was in the sink. Nevertheless, I don’t think this shawl will ever be thrown in the washing machine, dab clean only!

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The Pattern

Oh, Keiran Foley, what a beautiful mind you have…I’m constantly amazed by how he uses dropped stitches and lace to create amazing shapes in negative space. If you haven’t already, check out his website and blog it is very drool worthy. Camino Bubbles is a very simple charted pattern. It includes written instructions, but I truly think it would be harder to knit this if you only follow the written instructions. The chart is much easier to use. You have one set up chart(A), chart B is repeated as many times as you want, then a finishing chart(C). That’s all!IMG_2361

The Knit

I was delighted to find that after doing a few repeats of chart B, I didn’t need the pattern anymore. It was very easy to see where dropped stitches needed to go and the only thing I really needed to keep track of was how many rows I did on each repeat.I carried this shawl around with me everywhere and whipped it out if I ever had a minute or two to knit. I could stop in the middle of a drop stitch row and pick it back up an hour later and know exactly where I was! The pattern is very repetitive and self explanatory, which I love. Dropping the stitches was so fun. There was a primal satisfaction in finishing the last chart repeat and pausing to pull and stretch the shawl, watching as the yarn unraveled to reveal a perfect bubble. I goofed a few times and dropped the wrong stitches or one stitch too many, nothing my handy dandy crochet hook couldn’t fix. I would absolutely recommend “popping” the bubbles as you go, to make sure that you don’t have any stray dropped stitches.
As far as alteration go, I  knit this shawl longer than the pattern sample. I believe the sample had 7 repeats of chart B, I did 9.5 for a post-blocking size of 72″ long. I think it goes without saying that this is a must block project. It’s all scrunched up and awkward after casting off. I blocked this to two times it’s size after casting off and the length of the shawl took up my entire balcony. After drying, it settled to a very comfortable size. I love shawls that are at least 60″ wide. I feel like 72″ is just enough extra length to really work with the shawl style wise. The pattern also has an option for a 130st wide shawl.

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This is an A+ pattern, and I highly recommend it! It’s a brilliant use of dropped stitches and the shawl is very dynamic in lace weight. A perfect summer shawl that I will absolutely make again. Also, “Finding Nemo” colors😉

Fall is fast approaching (see the dead leaves in the background?) and I’m eager to cast on for fall knits. Despite a few more weeks of heat, I’m already in an autumn mindset. I can smell pumpkin and chilly nights on the wind and my fingers are itching for wool and textured oversized sweaters. Have you cast on for fall yet? Or are you hoping to complete one more summer knit? Let me know in the comments below!

Until next time, knit on!

 

P.S I have a new guest in my home…

A Note on Commissions

I think when you make an agreement to do a project for someone, you should prioritize that project. I believe it to be a sign of maturity and professional courtesy to place personal projects on hold and attempt to finish your customer’s project as quickly as possible and with your very best of effort. Especially if you’re being paid.

For the past three months I’ve been working on a commission for a LYS. A customer injured her shoulder and wanted her sweater completed for her, the LYS asked me to do it and I happily agreed. I had ten to twelve weeks to complete the work and I was told I would make a certain amount of money for making it. We had a verbal agreement. The sweater, the grey thing, was two thousand yards of various moss stitches in a size extra large knee length jacket. In grey. The instructions were beyond convoluted (if you have to say “at the same time” 5 times for one part of your sweater, you need a pattern rework ) and I had to start over three times just to get past the yoke. But I finished it. Here it is:

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Yep, I wouldn’t even do a photo shoot for that. Blurry instagram with me looking like I’ve been awake for four days is all you’re getting.

I took the sweater in to the LYS and handed it over. Three months. Almost all of spring and summer that could have been spent knitting cute tops and headbands. She hands me a check. I almost fall over. It is significantly short of our agreed on price, over $100 short. We discuss this and come to find out that they have a ceiling on how much they pay for commission work. I ask why she agreed to pay me more if she wasn’t actually going to, she gives me a rambling half answer. I’m a bit dumbfounded and realize there isn’t much I can do. Hold the customer’s sweater hostage and demand more money? That wouldn’t be fair to the customer who had no part in our financial deal. It would also be unseemly for me to stand there and argue. I wouldn’t win even if I did. I took my check with a smile and walked out, ignoring her offer for me to work a few Saturdays a month if I ever wanted to.

I was angry. I feel cheated and used and like an entire season of knitting was stolen from me. I sulked over this for an entire day. Now that I’ve had time to process this whole affair, and cast on for another project, I have a few notes to share with fellow knitters who might be new to doing commissions.

  1. Communication is a must

To be honest, this was not my first experience with this LYS. I previously did a commission for the shop and was paid the amount I asked for. However, when we first set up the deal, she informed me that she paid on a sliding scale. $.25-$.75 a yard based on the difficulty of the project. When I finished the project, I asked to be paid $.35 for the 1,000 yard project. She informed me that the maximum they pay for commissions was $250. I reminded her about the sliding scale. “Mhm, yeah…we usually only pay $250 though. I’ll pay you what you want this time though.” She never explained to me why she told me I would be paid on a sliding scale if she obviously had no intention of doing that.

Whenever I did work for this shop, it took me weeks to be paid after I’d already dropped off my finished item and we had terrible communication. It took her nearly three weeks to pay me for my first commission job. I called the shop multiple times, had to give her my address three times so she could mail me a check, and I went to the shop twice to pick up payments and she’d forgotten to leave the money for me. I once went to the shop to try and be paid, she stayed on the phone for twenty minutes with me standing there waiting and I finally had to leave, without payment, to make it to an event on time.

All this to say, if you and the customer you’re working for have terrible communication, don’t agree to work for them. It was stupid of me to persists in working for someone who would never answer my calls or have the courtesy to have my check waiting for me in a timely manner. If you can’t even have two minutes of the person’s time to ask questions or be paid, don’t bother.

2. The faintest ink is better than the strongest memory

As I said above, there was a lot of back and forth about what I would be paid for my work and I really had to go out of my way to get my paychecks. In hindsight, I can’t believe I never just had the gall to ask her “So, before I start, how much are you paying me for this?” It is not rude to confirm before hand how much the person thinks your time and energy is worth. If they think it’s rude to ask, don’t work with them. Take a few minutes and type up a simple contract for the both of you to sign. Nothing crazy, something simple will work fine as hard documentation of your agreement.

“I, so and so, agree to pay so and so x amount of monies for the completion of such and such by this date.” See? Simple.

Discuss  the yardage of the project you will be doing, the difficulty of the work and the amount of time it should take before agreeing to anything. Get all of the information about the project you need  while face to face with the person, it wouldn’t hurt to include these things in the contract as well. You’ll seem like a true professional if you do this; it’ll be an accurate reflection of the fact that your time and effort is valuable and you take your job seriously. If the person is turned off by this. Don’t work with them.

3. Be honest

Be honest with yourself and your customer. Tell them how much you think your work is truly worth. Don’t undersell yourself to get more work or overcharge to bleed your customer dry. This is a business transaction, not a blood sport. It should be pleasant and simple. If you really hate the project and think it’ll be a drag to do, let the person know upfront and ask to be paid accordingly. Don’t agree to a price that won’t make up for all the grumbling and complaining you’ll be doing while knitting on the project. If the person isn’t willing to pay you more, request to have a longer amount of time to complete the project or simply decline to do the work. You aren’t a slave, your time and skill are valuable. There is no shame failing to come to an agreement and simply declining to do the project.

4. Work hard

There is shame, however, in taking way too long to do a project and not doing your best. The grey thing was knit for a customer using the LYS to get her work done. In other words, me slacking on the sweater, not making it just right, or deliberately taking way too long to finish would be totally unfair to the customer. She had nothing to do with my failure to do business properly or the LYS underpaying me. If you’ve agreed to do something, do it. Don’t back out half way because you don’t like it anymore, or argue over payment after the work is already done. Have all your ducks in a row before even picking up your needles

Honestly, I know there is a lot of contention over knitting for pay. There is a plethora of knitters who are underpaid for their work and it is often very difficult to find a happy medium. I’m glad I’ve had this experience, though. I truly believe it will help me do business better in the future and have a more discerning eye for the work I’m asked to do and how much my skill is worth. Knitting should always bring joy, even commissioned work, but it’s not the responsibility of the customer to ensure your happiness and satisfaction. You must stand up for yourself and not be afraid to say ‘no’. Will I work for this yarn shop again? Probably not. Will I do more commissions? Totally. Will I get burned again? Maybe, but I’ve learned to take my work more seriously now, and hopefully I’ll be better prepared to deal with a transaction in the future.

I really hope my inexperience helps a few of you out there who are exploring the world of knitting for pay. Please don’t make the same silly mistakes I did, but more importantly, stay happy with your knitting- no matter what you get out of it.

Orchids and Waterlilies

Orchids and Waterlilies

Spring has finally sprung here in Kansas City. No more forty degree nights and 70 degree days. Its just breezy, perfectly tepid days. Yes. I never noticed Spring much back in Arkansas, though we definitely had it. I was so busy in school or working my first forty hour a week job to go outside and watch the seasons change. It was either cold or hot and it didn’t really matter either way at midnight while typing up a final paper or at 6am when I was being called in to work over time *shudders* but those days are behind me. And now my bedroom has a balcony on it! Outside our window we’re surrounded by lush greenery and all of the windows have been open since mid-March to let the sounds of chirping birds in.

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The first time I caught whiff of a warm breeze, I cast on for the Waterlily. I sweet little knit with a lace yoke and short sleeves to welcome warmer weather. I finished it up in about two or so weeks and I’ve worn in about five times already.

The Yarn

I used two skeins of Ella Rae Lace Merino in the colorway 125 (which I have deemed Raspberry Swirl). I’m grateful for Ella Rae’s generous yardage, I had just enough of the second skein left over to seam everything up and make repairs in the future. I love when that happens. It’s such a pain when you have half a skein left over or when you only need 20yds of another skein. So awkward. Ella Rae does it right.

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This yarn can be notorious for its skein to skein color variation. Even with yarns from the same dye lot. I had four of these skeins and you can certainly see a change in overall color hue from skein to skein. They’re all beautiful, but I had the luxury of picking the two skeins that were closest together in color. I decided against striping, but if you’re feeling a little unsure about any Ella Rae that you have, I would highly recommend striping it. The hue differences can be very drastic (as witnessed by several of my knitter friends who have frogged rather extensive stockinette works before…) Other than some naughty color consistency every once in a while, Ella Rae is one of my hands-down-favorite yarns to knit with. It has sheen, drape, and yardage for days. Probably the only merino yarn I would use for spring and summer knits.

The Pattern

So, I’m a little up in the air on this pattern. There are complaints on Ravelry about it being a bit confusing and I had to read it over a few times to understand. A lot of people were unclear about the divide for the sleeves. I think it was pretty self explanatory, but I can understand how the instructions were difficult to visualize. One thing I struggled with was the divide for the neck. While in hindsight, this seems obvious, the pattern doesn’t state that as you work the lace back and forth, decreasing along the edge for your v-neck, that each lace row will begin in different spots along the row to account for missing stitches and to keep all the lace in order. Depending on the row you begin on and your size, these spots will always be different. It was a bit of a challenge sometimes to correctly figure which stitch on the chart to start on. I wish the pattern had noted this so I could have had a heads up. Also, after I cast on my sleeves, I had the correct amount of stitches for my size, but a mysterious extra five stitches that were never knit into the lace. I won’t say its a pattern error (as this was mostly knit late at night)  but it’s something to watch out for.  Overall, the pattern is pretty straight forward, I just wish a few more notes were included along the way.

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The Knit

Alterations:

  • I knit this for finished size 36″ so I had two inches of positive ease.
  • I knit the body 15″ in length instead of the recommended 11.5. I have a fairly long torso and almost always make my tunics and shirts longer. Otherwise I’d be rocking belly shirts all the time.
  • I added some waist shaping for this. I have a fear of oversized box shaped things, I’m always nervous my shape will be consumed by all the excess fabric and it’ll look like I’m wearing a sack. A few decreases and increases make magic. I borrowed my shaping knitthehellout’s formula  “Around 6.5 inches begin decreasing 4 sts every 6 rows, 4 total times. Increase at the same rate at about 9.25 inches. Knit until piece measured 15.5 inches from the bottom until the armpit.”
  • I wanted a deeper v-neck. I began my v-neck after about 1.5″ of lace.
  • Saw many complaints of a sagging back neckline, so I followed the advice of several other knitters and decreased with p3tog across the entire back.

I had a lot of…issues while I was knitting this. It was just a rough two weeks (we all have ’em right?) I consistently derped up the lace section and had to rip back so many times. Instead of taking a break, I would just get angry and try again…at 1am, then make the same mistake…like I said, a bad two weeks. I think if I hadn’t been such a nut this would have been a much smoother knit. Either way, it only took two weeks, and all of the Ravelry forums and notes make this pattern and knit super easy to get through. A wardrobe staple for sure!

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Have you started your Spring knits yet or are you still finishing up cold weather knits? Have you jumped straight into summer knits? Let me know in the comments below!

 

 

Knitting Pays the Bills

Knitting Pays the Bills

Part 3 of From the Other Side: Knitting in the Mission Field to come soon!

Before I moved to KC, I decided that I had to continue working at a yarn shop in some capacity. I loved the work too much not to seek it out. I called around to several of the yarn shops and offered my services for knitting commissions. Too busy to knit up a shop sample for the next season? I’m your girl.

I’m currently working for one shop and I hope to be able to work for another nearby one as well. I’ve already completed one commission that I neglected to photo, and this weekend I picked up more work.
The blue one is a little baby sweater that needs to be seamed up. Simple enough, the grey one however…is a bit of a doosey. Rocky Road, a worsted weight, winter coat. A customer had an accident and hurt her shoulder, but still wants the coat finished, despite warming weather.

   
 I’ve got about a thousand yards of grey wool to knit through. I’m pretty grateful that I’ve been given 8-10 weeks to get it done though. This week, I’m going to focus all my energy on finishing my Waterlily this week and seaming up the baby sweater. Then I’ll dive into this sweater.

15″ down, time to divide for the yoke!

I don’t want this coat hanging over my head for too long so I want to devote a lot of energy to it, but I can’t stand the idea of not knitting on something for me for 8 weeks. That’s summer knitting time! I’ve decided to knock out a few pairs of socks on the side and hopefully cast on for another summer top while working on this. I haven’t picked a top yet, but I know I’ll be making myself a pair of Skew socks with this fun Blue Ridge Yarn

  
I feel so grateful to be able to knit for a side income. Not only does it loosen up our post-move budget, but it serves as a great way to stay close in the loop of all the knitting goings on in some sort of professional capacity. Once a yarn shop girl, always a yarn shop girl. I’m going to savor this next week of personal knitting before I dive into this commission. However, despite the 1000yds of grey, I’m feeling pretty great about saying knitting is my job. 

how luna feels about my artistic photos.